Leeds City Council
  • A to Z
  • Newsroom
  • Contact us
  • Accessibility
  • A- A+

Scheduled monuments and archaeology

What is a scheduled monument?

A scheduled monument is a nationally important monument or archaeological site, either above or below ground which has been given legal protection by being placed on a ‘list’ or schedule.
English Heritage takes the lead in identifying sites in England that should be placed on the schedule by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

Not all scheduled monuments are ancient. Monuments and archaeological remains of all ages can be protected through scheduling whether they are prehistoric burial mounds, 20th century remains of the coal industry or from World War II. Some monuments include standing buildings or ruins. Others have no visible remains above ground; it is their buried archaeology that is of national importance.

What does designation mean?

Scheduled monument consent is needed for any works that will affect a scheduled monument. Applications for consent must be made to the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport before any work is carried out. English Heritage give advice to the government on each application and administers the consent system. The aim is to ensure that the significance of the protected sites is safeguarded for the long term future. Contact English Heritage to find out more about the application process.

Carrying out unauthorised work to a scheduled monument is a criminal offence.

Other archaeological sites

West Yorkshire Archaeological Advisory Service (WYAAS) maintain the Historic Environment Record (HER) for the Leeds area and provide the Council’s archaeological advice. The HER includes information on all known archaeological sites and find spots in West Yorkshire and information on historic buildings and landscapes.
As well as the scheduled sites, WYASS have identified many additional sites of known archaeological importance which need to be considered when development is proposed. These sites are known as ‘Class II’ sites – see download.

Scheduled monuments in Leeds

There are 59 scheduled monuments in the Leeds district.

  • Aberford Dyke System – length of linear earthwork known as The Ridge, part of the Aberford Dyke System, 560m east of Potterton Bridge, Leeds
  • Aberford Dyke System – length of linear earthworks known as Becca Banks and The Ridge, part of the Aberford Dyke System, between Aberford and a quarry 590m north of Ass Bridge, Leeds
  • Aberford Dyke System – length of linear earthwork, part of the Aberford Dyke System, at Green Hill between Aberford and the Aberford by-pass, Leeds
  • Aberford Dyke System – length of linear earthwork, part of the Aberford Dyke System, at Field Lane between the Aberford bypass and Humphrey Dale Cottage, Aberford, Leeds
  • Aberford Dyke System – linear earthwork, part of the Aberford Dyke System, extending 770m east from Humphrey Dale Cottage, Aberford, Leeds
  • Aberford Dyke System – linear earthworks known as Woodhouse Moor Rein and South Dyke, part of the Aberford Dyke System, Aberford, Leeds
  • Barwick in Elmet large univallate hillfort and motte and bailey castle (SM 13299/01)
  • Barwick in Elmet large univallate hillfort and motte and bailey castle (SM 13299/02)
  • Calverley Wood – Cup marked rock in Calverley Wood, 200m north east of junction of Calverley Cutting and Thornhill Drive
  • Carlton – Anti-aircraft gunsite 280m east of Carlton Hall, Carlton, Leeds
  • Castle Hill Motte and Bailey Castle
  • Clayton Wood – Stone hut circle settlement in Clayton Wood on the south west side of Iveson Drive
  • Craven Hall Hill – Cairn west of Craven Hall Hill
  • Craven Hall Hill – Rock with parallel groves 95m west of flag post on Craven Hall Hill
  • Colton Shrunken Medieval Village
  • Cookridge – Cup, ring and groove marked rock 15m from south wall of Gab Wood 300m east of Moseley Farm, Cookridge
  • Cookridge – Medieval farmstead in Ireland Wood, 150m north east of Cookridge Hospital
  • Cookridge – Cup, ring and groove marked rock 2m south of north wall of Gab Wood 330m east of Moseley Farm, Cookridge
  • Dalton Parlours Roman Villa and Iron Age Settlement
  • Danefield Wood – Roman period native settlement in Danefield Wood 490m south west of Stubbings Farm
  • Fairburn Ings (Newton Abbey) Moat
  • Gipton Wood – Late prehistoric enclosed settlements in Gipton Wood, at the southern end of Oakwood Drive
  • Great Skirtful of Stones – Ring Cairn 475m south east of the Great Skirtful of Stones
  • Great Skirtful of Stones – Ring Cairn 90m east south east of the great Skirtful of Stones (Outside Leeds MD)
  • Great Skirtful of Stones – Cairn known as the Great Skirtful of Stones
  • Grim’s Ditch – length of Grim’s Ditch extending 1.4km from a point 70m south of Cotton Road east to the south east corner of Avenue Wood
  • Grim’s Ditch – length of Grim’s Ditch from Cotton Road east to the A63, Colton Common
  • Grim’s Ditch – length of Grim’s Ditch 260m west of Brown Moor Farm
  • Grim’s Ditch – length of Grim’s Ditch immediately east of Barrowby Road
  • Grim’s Ditch – length of Grim’s Ditch immediately north of Gamblethorpe
  • Grim’s Ditch – length of Grim’s Ditch partly under Bullerthorpe Lane 620m north of Gamblethorpe
  • Harewood Castle
  • Harewood Park – Carved rock known as the grey stone in grey stone pasture, Harewood Park, 370m south east of New Bridge
  • Hawksworth Moor – Cairn on Hawksworth Moor; largest one of a group of cairns
  • Hawksworth Moor – Two Cairns on Hawksworth Moor, one with an internal cist
  • Hawksworth Moor – small cairn north east of large cairn on Hawksworth Moor
  • Hawksworth Moor – Enclosure 50m north east of Horncliff Slade on Hawkworth Moor
  • Hawksworth Spring – carved rock in Hawksworth Spring
  • Horsforth – Gritstone pillar with three cup marks in the north pavement of the A65 at Horsforth, 440m south east of the roundabout at Low Fold
  • Howley Hall; a 16th century country house and gardens
  • Iveson Wood – Stone hut circle settlement in Iveson Wood
  • King Lane Farm – rock carved human figure 570m south of King Lane Farm
  • Kirkstall Abbey and precinct including a prehistoric cup and ring marked rock
  • Manor Garth Hill Ringwork
  • Middleton Park shaft mounds (SM 30963/01)
  • Middleton Park shaft mounds (SM 30963/02)
  • Moat House – Settlement site revealed by aerial photography near Moat House
  • Newtown Farm – prehistoric settlement, field system and medieval wood banks 600m east of Newtown Farm
  • Otley Bridge
  • Otley Chevin – Cup and ring marked rock known as the Knotties Stone on Otley Chevin, 270m north east of the Royalty Public House
  • Owlcotes Deserted Medieval Village
  • Pelstone Cragg – Carved rock on Pelstone Cragg 530m west of Danefield House
  • Poolscar Wood – Roman period native settlement in Poolscar Wood, 350m south of Stubbings Farm
  • Potterton Deserted Medieval Village
  • Rawdon – Cup and ring marked rock 40m south east of Hillcourt, Rawdon
  • Rothwell Castle
  • Stank Hall Quasi-Manorial site
  • Wetherby Bridge
  • Wharfemeadows Park – Cup and ring marked rock in Wharfemeadows Park, West of Newall Hall
Close