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Climate Change

Tackling climate change is one of the strategic priorities for Leeds City Council.  Reducing damaging carbon emissions can save us all money and preparing for likely changes to weather patterns means that we can protect everyone’s quality of life.

Leeds’ Climate Change Strategy
Leeds’ climate change strategy is a clear set of priorities that organisations across Leeds are working on to tackle the causes and impact of climate change.

It sets out a far reaching, city-wide approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and making sure that Leeds is resilient to changing weather patterns. The priorities build on the successes of work already being delivered by the Leeds Initiative partners.

Leeds City Council’s climate change action plan
The council’s climate change action plan shows all of the projects that it is working on to make sure it reduces it’s carbon emissions and helps others to do the same.

Local Climate Impacts Profile (LCLIP) using the past to prepare for the future
To help the council and other organisations prepare for the effects of climate change, past extreme weather events and their consequences have been examined. These tell us how organisations and communities have responded and can help us identify vulnerable areas. We can use this information to plan for the future.

British Energy Challenge in Leeds
Leeds is committed to reducing CO2 emissions by 80% by 2050 but the scale of change needed to meet this target is hard to visualise. To help you understand the sorts of decisions the will need to be taken, the government has developed the 2050 Calculator. This is a user friendly model that lets you create your own UK emissions reduction pathway, and see the impact using real UK data. It brings energy and emissions data alive, showing the benefits, costs and trade-offs of different versions of the future. It allows you to explore the fundamental questions of how the UK can best meet energy needs and reduce emissions. So can you keep the lights on and reduce emissions by 80%?

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